Journalism —

Finally, Minnesota Knows: The Case of Jacob Wetterling

ABOVE: Jacob Wetterling when he disappeared, and a computer-generated image of how he may have looked as an 18-year-old.

My phone buzzed as I left Mickey’s Diner. I was swelled by half a chicken, coleslaw, baked beans and toast, and the soles of my shoes were caked in grease.

I reached for my phone and noticed I’d received an AMBER alert - a pop-up warning sent by police appealing for information about a missing child.

Categories: 

Freedom of the press: how much is enough?

Freedom of the press: how much is enough?

 

As journalists we must always have in our minds two words: accuracy and freedom.

The first one: it’s our duty to be just/righteous with each part of our stories, be balanced, and attached to the facts. But for the second one, I just noticed that sometimes we forget its importance.

Categories: 

Tags: 

5 a.m ST UP

5 a.m ST UP

In Minnesota it was seven o’clock in the morning on August 26th when I woke up to see an unexpected message in Facebook. “Stay safe” my colleague and friend from BTV News Yavor Nikolov had warned me. In Sofia it was three in the afternoon. It was my second week in the WPI fellowship and it was difficult for me to follow through everything newsworthy in Bulgaria. Why should I be safe, I wrote back anxiously. His reply was a BBC news link. It was a post about the killing of Alison Parker and Adam Ward.

Categories: 

The First Amendment, the Freedom of the Press and you

The First Amendment, the Freedom of the Press and you
"Government shall make no law (…) abridging the freedom of speech or of the press". It is the First Amendment in the Bill of Rights from 1791 that manifests this fundamental freedom for the United States States of America - by that time a young democracy aged 15 years. As you may know a freedom as such never comes for free. In many parts of the world our ancestors had to fight for this freedom at some time. In far too many countries the people still have to fight for it. Often they pay the highest price you can imagine. They pay with their lives. And even if other countries have already achieved this fundamental freedom, you can never be sure that it is going to last forever. Freedom is not for free. There is a price we have to pay. At least pay some attention.

Categories: 

Tags: 

On life and death - in the news

Unfathomable deaths have dominated the news this week both in the US and Europe. In the US, a former reporter murdered two journalists from his former channel in Virginia on Wednesday on air. In Europe, Austrian police found a truck with dozens of bodies abandoned on the roadside.

Categories: 

Tags: 

Of newsrooms and noise

Of newsrooms and noise

The opportunities we’ve had in the last several weeks to visit some of the most fabled newsrooms in the U.S. have been both inspiring and humbling. Whether standing by the hallowed coffee machines of the New York Times after attending the morning news meeting, or making idle chit chat in the elevator at the Washington Post, I’ve been struck by how hard so many people must have worked in these newsrooms, to turn them into the living legends that they are.

Categories: 

Finding Sweden in Minnesota and realizing that presidential candidates better kiss Cuban babies in Miami

Finding Sweden in Minnesota and realizing that presidential candidates better kiss Cuban babies in Miami

ELY, MINNESOTA and MIAMI, FLORIDA 

Just a few weeks ago we were nine international journalists in the wilderness area close to the small town of Ely in northern Minnesota, just a few hours south of the Canadian border.

The surroundings are the spitting image of the Swedish forests in my neighboring country. Mind you, when I drive north of the flatter cultivated part, the scenery slowly becomes more raw and hilly.

Categories: 

Size Matters

After visiting the Native-American National Pipestone Monument in Tracy, Minnesota, I was given an “Indian” nickname by my colleagues: Sleepy Giant. The ‘sleepy’ aspect comes from being somewhat exhausted at certain times, and not afraid to say so. The giant part is nothing new: I’m 6,5 and quite massive. When I’m confronted with others telling me I’m gigantic, I usually try to turn that into an opportunity to share a fun fact: in my home country, the Netherlands, the tallest people in the world roam the grounds.

Categories: 

Tags: 

A dangerous game

A dangerous game

The translucent green of the double-volume Journalists Memorial Gallery at the Newseum, lends it a serene air that belies its darker nature. It is, when one stops to think about it, a sombre sight to behold: the names of thousands of journalists who’ve died in the field over the last 177 years, etched into panel after panel of sandblasted glass to form a wall that stretches two stories high.

Categories: 

The danger of a single narrative

Couple of weeks ago, up in Ely, I was sitting up late at night talking to my co-host Sharon Staat. Sharon lives in Chicago but visits Anne Swenson up in Ely twice a year – they’ve been friends for over 50 years! The details of our conversation escape me, but I remember it covered a broad swathe of subjects from immigration in America to concerns over terrorism to Native American history and women’s rights. It was all perfectly lovely till Sharon mentioned that she was a Republican.

Categories: 

Tags: 

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Journalism —